Wednesday, July 17, 2019

#AuthorToolboxBlogHop July 2019

Welcome to the July 2019 version of #AuthorToolboxBlogHop organized by the amazing Raimey Gallant. To join or just enjoy all the great ideas you'll discover on this tour, find the entire list of participants here.

I shared in last month's Toolbox that I was having my knee replaced a few days after the hop. All went well and recovery is going smoothly and ahead of schedule. That doesn't mean I'm out jogging around the neighborhood yet, but I'm happy with the progress. On the not so good side, I can't sit at my desk for extended periods of time because my knee swells no matter how I try to prop it up and ice. So my writing progress on my current WIP is slower than I'd like.

My contribution to the Toolbox this month is likely a familiar craft item that all of us have dealt with throughout our careers. I received a contract for my 23rd romance novel from the small press who have published all  my romance novels. Each time I receive a contract, my publisher asks me for a blurb, a short excerpt to share on their website, and a one-liner or a logline. Some authors call it the 'elevator pitch', meaning it can be shared at short notice. Even after 23 novels, I revert to a formula to create my loglines. Here are the two I use most often.

When __________ happens to ____________ (he/she/they) must ___________ or face ___________.

When situation happens, protagonist must act to defeat antagonist and prevent disaster.

The five things I figure out before I write the logline are:
Situation, protagonist, the action, the antagonist, and the disaster. Once I am satisfied with the logline, I can use that same sentence  and expand it into the back cover blurb. Each of those five things can be expanded to a few sentences or combined into short paragraphs.

Do you use another formula for your loglines? Do you find them easy or do they drive you crazy? 




22 comments:

  1. That's a really good formula. It covers the basics of who-what-where.

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  2. Glad to hear the recovery is going well overall!

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  3. Loglines help me keep on track when I'm in full writing mode. I do use a recipe of sorts. What does the protag want? What is stopping them? What happens if they succeed and/or fail? That kind of thing. :-)

    Anna from elements of emaginette

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  4. This is something I always falter at; thanks so much for the advice, i'll definitely be trying this in future!

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  5. Hi Susan - glad the knee is recovering as you are too. Time away won't do any harm (for a while - anyway) ... sounds like you've worked out a good formula - take care and cheers Hilary

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  6. That is a good formula to use indeed. I just wing it, but it usually comes out rather similar.

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  7. Glad your knee replacement went well! Congrats on getting a contract for a 23rd book!

    betty

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  8. Awesome you are recovering well.
    That's a cool formula.

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  9. Glad you are recovering, and what a neat way to sum up your books!

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  10. 23 books - well done! I guess the formula is working for you :)

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  11. It's interesting. I recently attended a panel where someone was discussing this very topic, and they defined it very similarly "World+Character+Problem+Consequences."
    I'm curious, do you believe in crafting these resources (the logline, tagline, elevator pitch, etc.) after you write the story, or before? I've read a few articles where the author propones creating them before a rough draft, as a kind of litmus test, but I could also see it as very challenging to do before one has the story down, and potentially misleading, as an author might feel overly committed to writing a story that fits the lines they've already crafted.
    What are your thoughts?

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  12. I am immediately applying your formula to my current story. Great help!

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  13. Ooh! Great tip! I've bookmarked this for when I need to write the dratted elevator pitch for my next project. Thanks for sharing :-)

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  14. I hope you have a speedy and easy recovery from the surgery, Susan. I'll be doing that again this fall, getting the other knee done.

    That formula for coming up with the logline is excellent!

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  15. So glad to hear recovering has been going well! Sorry it's resulted in (understandably) slower writing progress, though. Best of luck with this WIP!

    And ooh, that's such a great formula for loglines. Will definitely have to remember this!

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  16. Very useful. I like the template approach!

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  17. Glad you are better. That was really helpful.

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  18. I love this, Susan, and will incorporate it into my toolbox.
    Glad the surgery went well and you are healing. The HH had the same surgery. He's had so many parts replaced he's practically bionic:) Heh.

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  19. I've been using a slightly different formula, but I kind of like yours, too, so I'm going to bookmark this so the next time I do this, I have a couple more formula options to choose from. Thanks, Susan!

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  20. Great formula. That's pretty similar to the one I'm using from the book Save the Cat Writes a Novel. Thanks for sharing!

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  21. Wow, Susan! This is great advice. I love having a sentence to fill in for a logline. Thanks so much for this. I hope you will be out "jogging" before you know it. You are in my prayers for a speedy recovery. All best to you.

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  22. Thank you for sharing
    https://aab-edu.net/

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