Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Suburban Stockade by Teresa Peschel

Suburban Stockade by Teresa Peschel Part One: Something for Readers. My book “Suburban Stockade” is a series of essays laying out how my husband and I made our lives more resilient, allowing us to better cope with the vagaries of life and the very uncertain future bearing down on us. I really believe that anyone can do this. You start where you are and move on from there. That does not mean it’s easy. It does mean considering the various aspects of your life: is your life what you want it to be? Does your life suit your values? “Suburban Stockade” is not a series of tips (although I do have some, addressing topics I’ve never seen addressed elsewhere such as the Window Dance and daylighting), nor do I wear my tinfoil hat very tight. Everything we did, my family and I, the choices we made to live on less, consume less, and do what was right for us and not for the consumer society around us, now allows us to do what we do today. We are self-published writers. Are we rich? No. Are we hanging on? Yes. And we can continue to do so. We have some resilience and we are not at the mercy of the bank. Part Two: Something for Writers Kings use gold. Gentlemen use silver. Peasants use barter. Slaves use debt. Why did I choose this aphorism? Because writing, for most of us, won’t bring in truckloads of money. However, if you are willing to live low on the food chain, the income generated by writing may be all you need. You can be freer. You can become more financially independent. You can use the power of “NO.” You can become a full-time writer and quit that job you hate. Part Three: Your book blurb and buy links: “Suburban Stockade” is Teresa Peschel’s manifesto memoir about her quest to drop out of the rat race, embrace her peasant ancestry, and prepare her family for an uncertain future. Peschel describes not just how we got here, but how we can escape, by not playing the game where the rules are set by corporations and economists and rigged by politicians and the media. Escape into a world where we pay down debts, save money, buy a home we can age in, keep ourselves secure, and cut spending through simple tasks such as insulating our home, hanging laundry, searching for mongo and obtainium, and effective grocery shopping. “Suburban Stockade” will not teach you how to garden, fill your arsenal, and prepare for zombies and the fall of civilization. It will teach you the value of organization, public libraries, heating and cooling your home through the Window Dance, enhancing your home’s natural light, installing hedges and fences to improve your privacy, learning the rudiments of sewing and cooking, and grocery shopping like a Jedi master. “Suburban Stockade” is a manifesto, a polemic, and a chat with your smart neighbor over coffee about your families’ futures. It is for people who seek answers to the dissatisfaction and apprehension they feel. Following its advice can’t prevent the bad times from coming, but it can cushion the shock when they arrive. Trade paperback: https://www.amazon.com/Suburban-Stockade-Strengthening-Against-Unsure/dp/1546380280/ Kindle: https://www.amazon.com/Suburban-Stockade-Strengthening-Against-Uncertain-ebook/dp/B07172GB99/ Nook: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/suburban-stockade-teresa-peschel/1128801738 Google Play: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Teresa_Peschel_Suburban_Stockade?id=p8JdDwAAQBAJ Part Four: Your short bio and all media links to you: Teresa Peschel lives with her family, her dog Muffy, and two mostly useless cats in the Sweetest Place on Earth. She has long been interested in sustainability, resource depletion, and finding a balanced life, not too much and not too little. Why take more than you need when other people and animals need lives and space too? Teresa Peschel’s links Peschel Press

15 comments:

  1. We could all use with simpler living.

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    1. Hi Alex,

      We could, but so much of simple living is saying no!
      We had to be willing to miss out on all kinds of things.
      On the other hand, because we didn't live like anyone else, Bill and I are able to write full-time.
      This can't be done if you have to pay the mortgage.

      Teresa Peschel

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  2. Sounds like an interesting read. Might have to look into it.

    betty

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    1. Hi Betty!
      I'd be delighted if you did.
      If you're in Central Pa, we (Peschel Press) will be manning a booth at the Hershey Winter Arts Show in Hershey High School on Saturday, 3 November 2018. It's a great craft show with about 150 vendors and it's juried so there's no yardsale fodder or Chinese made junk.
      We'll have 'Suburban Stockade' available along with the rest of our lineup if you want to stop and chat about the indie publishing business.

      Bill and I have sure learned a lot about what NOT to do.

      Teresa Peschel

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  3. Hi Susan,

    Thanks so much for publishing me on your website!

    Teresa

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  4. I'm with Alex. We are tired of complexity.

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    1. We do have some control over the complexity in our lives. Sadly, it involves lots of saying 'no'. As an example, we still use a landline. My sister provides us with a smartphone which I only use when I'm selling at a craft show as it allows me to take credit and debit cards. Otherwise, I do without.
      I spent years in the Navy on an electronic dogleash and that colors my thinking: I call other people. They don't call me.
      However, how many people today can live without being glued to a smartphone? I get strange looks, let me tell you.

      Teresa

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  5. Yep, the way to be. All this crap that the media force feeds people and they believe is what keeps them slaves to debt. Got that part down. Still stuck in the rat race though as otherwise I'd be in a cardboard box lol

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    1. I strongly, highly, extremely recommend two terrific books. (after mine of course).
      They changed our lives and you can get them from every library.
      'Your Money or Your Life' by Joe Dominguez and Vicki Robin
      'The Complete Tightwad Gazette' by Amy Dacyczyn

      Read both books and you can pull yourself further away from the rat race.

      Teresa

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  6. This is brilliant. It's how i've tried to live, somewhat, where i could. Of course, the family is kicking and screaming all the way. Maybe having them read this book would help.

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    1. It can! I address spouse conversion in one chapter.
      One thing that made a huge difference for us was that our TV (we only have one) was never hooked up to the outside world. It still isn't. It plays only games and dvds. When the kids were little, they weren't exposed to the constant barrage of ads. If they didn't see it, they didn't want it.
      This also encouraged more reading on their part.

      My dear husband saw real benefits so he was fully onboard.

      Teresa

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  7. Fascinating and it certainly hits home, Teresa. I am thinking all about this. Selling off the high priced condo and living in a sweet little house with my own garden and high walls. LOL. It is time to SIMPLIFY. Luckily, I am the sort who can do a lot. Home repairs, paint, decorate, etc. I just need the perfect little space. Once I sell my place in Chicago, I will park at my tiny condo in Orlando and maybe just hang there for a while. Very affordable, but I definitely don't like condo life anymore. It is TIME FOR A DRASTIC CHANGE.

    All the best with your book!

    Hi, Susan... thanks for featuring Teresa today... Hope all is well!

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    1. Hi Michael,

      Sadly, there is no perfect space. I actually devote an entire chapter to house hunting in the book. Start by figuring out what you need. Closer to services is always better since living on a sunny dirt road deep in bear country means you have to drive for every single thing. If you're working, get a map and draw a 20 mile radius circle around the job. Stay in this magic circle to keep your commute shorter.

      Houses and spouses: nothing can cost you more or make your life better if they're well chosen.

      Good luck!

      Teresa

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  8. Replies
    1. Hi John Doe,

      Thanks for your kind comment on my synopsis of 'Suburban Stockade'. I had a lot to say: my dear husband edited me down from 160,000 words to 130,000 some words.

      Good luck to you!

      Teresa

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