Saturday, April 12, 2014

K: A to Z Blogging Challenge


Welcome to another day in the A to Z Blogging Challenge. Find the entire list here. My theme this year is world-building. Mostly I’m asking questions that I believe need to be considered whether you creating a medieval fantasy world, a science fiction story or even a contemporary novel. The ideas I present aren’t in a particular order as I had to fit them into the alphabetical order needed. And don’t forget to visit the other blog I’m part of during the A to Z Challenge over at the IWSG. Now onto your world.
Relatives often provide all the drama needed for a great story plot. Kinship can be complicated in many ways. A great example is the TV show Once Upon a Time where it seems like a family connection is revealed every week. And many of the family members are life long enemies. Devising a family tree to keep track of familial relationships from generations ago can help build your world's history and expose opportunities for story complexities.

Have you read a book with unique family connections? Do you like books with family-enemies, frenemies, at the center of the conflict? Know some fictional families that would have really terrible family gatherings?

21 comments:

  1. Safe to say family get-togethers on Game of Thrones don't go well...

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  2. haha once upon a time is getting ridiculous, soon all the genes will be the same and they will all die out. It can make or some fun interaction though

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  3. i think this is so important, and keeping track of all those relatives is a huge challenge. It's as hard as trying to keep track of them in real life.

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  4. Families are an endless source of inspiration- so much drama and tension going on there!

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  5. Who do we love/hate more than the relatives? Ha! Just kidding. Sort of. I mean, it is a great source for conflict in a story. Especially when ruling families fight.

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  6. I've read one that had some really good family connections/conflicts, and my debut had some basic family conflict, but mostly the books I read don't have it.

    A-Z Challenge at Father Nature's Corner

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  7. "Relatives often provide all the drama needed for a great story plot." There is nothing more true than that statement! One of my tips to writers is to look at your family and your past to get inspiration for family drama and plot ideas.

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  8. "Relatives often provide all the drama needed for a great story plot." Oh man, is this so true!! All you need for a conflict is to do a little digging around a family tree :) great writing prompt there, actually... ;)

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  9. How about some true life family discord with the Hatfields and the McCoys?

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  10. I did have to keep track of a bunch of families in my witchy regency romance, Grimoire. And Yes! Families can create a never ending supply of trouble :)

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  11. I love the dynamics of families in a story... it makes it that much more real. We ALL have families of some sort and it a great way to grasp your reader's attention.

    Thanks for another great tip, Susan!

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  12. I have a dreadful habit of forgetting the ages of my character's relatives. I always have to re-read to remember what I wrote!

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  13. I really need to watch Once Upon a Time, I think I'd like it!

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  14. I could mention a couple of my classic favorites: War and Peace, and The Budenbroks >:)

    Cold As Heaven

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  15. The commercials for "Once Upon A Time" always look like fun. Might have to make a note to watch it some time….

    Madeline @ The Shellshank Redemption
    Minion, Capt. Alex's Ninja Minion Army
    The 2014 Blogging from A-Z Challenge

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  16. Family or the lack thereof can/do shape a character. For instance, in the Stephanie Plum series each family member is unique. Their byplay enhances the novel by showing and not telling who the MC is. On the flip side, J.D. Robb's MC, Eve Dallas, has no family. Her family ultimately becomes her husband, his butler, and her co-workers. In this way, their interaction (kinship) reveals many aspects of her character.

    Get-togethers with both groups... very entertaining. And just two examples of kinship at work.

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  17. I totally agree with Alex's comment re: Game of Thrones. :)

    I'm pretty sure for most of my characters, family dynamics are an essential element.

    In fact, you've got me thinking about my characters in an entirely new light! Something to blog about sometime, perhaps ...!

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  18. thats why reality tv is so popular - no writers needed! just gawk at the attention seekers with their embarrassing moments as they unfold... ha!
    we need to incorporate awesome dynamics to keep readers gawking!

    happy K day!

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  19. Family dynamics are always fun, especially when the stakes are high. :)

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  20. Great advice- those cousins/arch enemies/vitally important to the plot people make for a great story.

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